Articles | Volume 20, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 12483–12497, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-12483-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 12483–12497, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-12483-2020

Research article 31 Oct 2020

Research article | 31 Oct 2020

Polar stratospheric clouds initiated by mountain waves in a global chemistry–climate model: a missing piece in fully modelling polar stratospheric ozone depletion

Andrew Orr et al.

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Cited articles

AIRS/Aqua Observations of Gravity Waves, re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories, http://doi.org/10.17616/R34J42, 2020. 
Alexander, J. M. and Teitelbaum, H.: Observation and analysis of a large amplitude mountain wave event over the Antarctic Peninsula, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D21103, https://doi.org/10.1029/2006JD008368, 2007. 
Alexander, S. P., Klekociuk, A. R., Pitts, M. C., McDonald, A. J., and Arevalo-Torres, A.: The effect of orographic gravity waves on Antarctic polar stratosphere cloud occurrence and composition, J. Geophys. Res., 116, D06109, https://doi.org/10.1029/2010JD015184, 2011. 
Alexander, S. P., Klekociuk, A. R., McDonald, A. J., and Pitts, M. C.: Quantifying the role of orographic gravity waves on polar stratospheric cloud occurrence in the Antarctic and the Arctic, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 11493–11507, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013JD020122, 2013. 
Alexander, S., Orr, A., Webster, S., and Murphy, D.: Observations and fine-scale model simulations of gravity waves over Davis, East Antarctica (69 S, 78 E), J. Geophys. Res., 122, 7355–7370, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017JD026615, 2017.  
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Short summary
Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are clouds found in the Antarctic winter stratosphere and are implicated in the formation of the ozone hole. These clouds can sometimes be formed or enhanced by mountain waves, formed as air passes over hills or mountains. However, this important mechanism is missing in coarse-resolution climate models, limiting our ability to simulate ozone. This study examines an attempt to include the effects of mountain waves and their impact on PSCs and ozone.
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