Articles | Volume 16, issue 15
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 9591–9610, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9591-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 9591–9610, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9591-2016

Research article 02 Aug 2016

Research article | 02 Aug 2016

Tracking city CO2 emissions from space using a high-resolution inverse modelling approach: a case study for Berlin, Germany

Dhanyalekshmi Pillai et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Approximately 70 % of total CO2 emissions arise from cities; however, there exist large uncertainties in quantifying urban emissions. The present study investigates the potential of a satellite mission like CarbonSat to retrieve the city emissions via inverse modelling techniques. The study makes a valid conclusion that an instrument like CarbonSat has high potential to provide important information on city emissions when exploiting the observations using a high-resolution modelling system.
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