Articles | Volume 20, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 11527–11550, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-11527-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 11527–11550, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-11527-2020
Measurement report
08 Oct 2020
Measurement report | 08 Oct 2020

Measurement report: Characterization of severe spring haze episodes and influences of long-range transport in the Seoul metropolitan area in March 2019

Hwajin Kim et al.

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Cited articles

Allan, J. D., Delia, A. E., Coe, H., Bower, K. N., Alfarra, M. R., Jimenez, J. L., Middlebrook, A. M., Drewnick, F., Onasch, T. B., Canagaratna, M. R., Jayne, J. T., and Worsnop, D. R.: A generalised method for the extraction of chemically resolved mass spectra from aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer data, J. Aerosol Sci., 35, 909–922, 10.1016/j.jaerosci.2004.02.007, 2004. 
Allan, J. D., Williams, P. I., Morgan, W. T., Martin, C. L., Flynn, M. J., Lee, J., Nemitz, E., Phillips, G. J., Gallagher, M. W., and Coe, H.: Contributions from transport, solid fuel burning and cooking to primary organic aerosols in two UK cities, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 647–668, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-10-647-2010, 2010. 
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Short summary
Severe spring haze and influences of long-range transport in the Seoul metropolitan area (SMA) in March 2019 were investigated. Simultaneous downwind (SMA) and upwind (Beijing) measurements using AMS and ACSM over the same period showed that PM species can be transported in approximately 2 d. Nitrate was the most responsible, and sulfate and two regional-transport-influenced SOAs also contributed. Enhancement of Pb also showed that the haze in the SMA was influenced by the regional transport.
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