Articles | Volume 21, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2427–2455, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2427-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2427–2455, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2427-2021

Research article 18 Feb 2021

Research article | 18 Feb 2021

Potential of future stratospheric ozone loss in the midlatitudes under global warming and sulfate geoengineering

Sabine Robrecht et al.

Related authors

Mechanism of ozone loss under enhanced water vapour conditions in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere in summer
Sabine Robrecht, Bärbel Vogel, Jens-Uwe Grooß, Karen Rosenlof, Troy Thornberry, Andrew Rollins, Martina Krämer, Lance Christensen, and Rolf Müller
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 5805–5833, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5805-2019,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5805-2019, 2019
Short summary
The maintenance of elevated active chlorine levels in the Antarctic lower stratosphere through HCl null cycles
Rolf Müller, Jens-Uwe Grooß, Abdul Mannan Zafar, Sabine Robrecht, and Ralph Lehmann
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2985–2997, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2985-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2985-2018, 2018
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Aerosols | Research Activity: Atmospheric Modelling | Altitude Range: Stratosphere | Science Focus: Chemistry (chemical composition and reactions)
Mountain-wave-induced polar stratospheric clouds and their representation in the global chemistry model ICON-ART
Michael Weimer, Jennifer Buchmüller, Lars Hoffmann, Ole Kirner, Beiping Luo, Roland Ruhnke, Michael Steiner, Ines Tritscher, and Peter Braesicke
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 9515–9543, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9515-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9515-2021, 2021
Short summary
The outflow of Asian biomass burning carbonaceous aerosol into the UTLS in spring: Radiative effects seen in a global model
Prashant Chavan, Suvarna Fadnavis, Tanusri Chakroborty, Christopher E. Sioris, Sabine G. Griessbach, and Rolf Müller
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-494,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-494, 2021
Revised manuscript accepted for ACP
Short summary
Co-emission of volcanic sulfur and halogens amplifies volcanic effective radiative forcing
John Staunton-Sykes, Thomas J. Aubry, Youngsub M. Shin, James Weber, Lauren R. Marshall, Nathan Luke Abraham, Alex Archibald, and Anja Schmidt
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 9009–9029, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9009-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9009-2021, 2021
Evaluating the simulated radiative forcings, aerosol properties, and stratospheric warmings from the 1963 Mt Agung, 1982 El Chichón, and 1991 Mt Pinatubo volcanic aerosol clouds
Sandip S. Dhomse, Graham W. Mann, Juan Carlos Antuña Marrero, Sarah E. Shallcross, Martyn P. Chipperfield, Kenneth S. Carslaw, Lauren Marshall, N. Luke Abraham, and Colin E. Johnson
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 13627–13654, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13627-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13627-2020, 2020
Short summary
The impact of recent changes in Asian anthropogenic emissions of SO2 on sulfate loading in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and the associated radiative changes
Suvarna Fadnavis, Rolf Müller, Gayatry Kalita, Matthew Rowlinson, Alexandru Rap, Jui-Lin Frank Li, Blaž Gasparini, and Anton Laakso
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 9989–10008, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-9989-2019,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-9989-2019, 2019
Short summary

Cited articles

Abalos, M., Randel, W. J., Kinnison, D. E., and Garcia, R. R.: Using the artificial tracer E90 to examine present and future UTLS tracer transport in WACCM, J. Atmos. Sci., 74, 3383–3403, https://doi.org/10.1175/JAS-D-17-0135.1, 2017. a
Anderson, J. G. and Clapp, C. E.: Coupling free radical catalysis, climate change, and human health, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 20, 10569–10587, https://doi.org/10.1039/C7CP08331A, 2018. a, b
Anderson, J. G., Wilmouth, D. M., Smith, J. B., and Sayres, D. S.: UV dosage levels in summer: Increased risk of ozone loss from convectively injected water vapor, Science, 337, 835–839, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1222978, 2012. a, b, c, d, e, f, g
Anderson, J. G., Weisenstein, D. K., Bowman, K. P., Homeyer, C. R., Smith, J. B., Wilmouth, D. M., Sayres, D. S., Klobas, J. E., Leroy, S. S., Dykema, J. A., and Wofsy, S. C.: Stratospheric ozone over the United States in summer linked to observations of convection and temperature via chlorine and bromine catalysis, P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 114, E4905–E4913, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1619318114, 2017. a, b, c, d, e
Ball, W. T., Alsing, J., Mortlock, D. J., Staehelin, J., Haigh, J. D., Peter, T., Tummon, F., Stübi, R., Stenke, A., Anderson, J., Bourassa, A., Davis, S. M., Degenstein, D., Frith, S., Froidevaux, L., Roth, C., Sofieva, V., Wang, R., Wild, J., Yu, P., Ziemke, J. R., and Rozanov, E. V.: Evidence for a continuous decline in lower stratospheric ozone offsetting ozone layer recovery, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 1379–1394, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-1379-2018, 2018. a
Download
Short summary
Column ozone protects life on Earth from radiation damage. Stratospheric chlorine compounds cause immense ozone loss in polar winter. Whether similar loss processes can occur in the lower stratosphere above North America today or in future is a matter of debate. We show that these ozone loss processes are very unlikely today or in future independently of whether sulfate geoengineering is applied and that less than 0.1 % of column ozone would be destroyed by this process in any future scenario.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint