Articles | Volume 16, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 9321–9348, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9321-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 9321–9348, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9321-2016

Research article 28 Jul 2016

Research article | 28 Jul 2016

Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

Anna L. Hodshire et al.

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Cited articles

Barsanti, K. C. and Pankow, J. F.: Thermodynamics of the formation of atmospheric organic particulate matter by accretion reactions – Part 1: aldehydes and ketones, Atmos. Environ., 38, 4371–4382, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2004.03.035, 2004.
Barsanti, K. C. and Pankow, J. F.: Thermodynamics of the formation of atmospheric organic particulate matter by accretion reactions – 2. Dialdehydes, methylglyoxal, and diketones, Atmos. Environ., 39, 6597–6607, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2005.07.056, 2005.
Barsanti, K. C. and Pankow, J. F.: Thermodynamics of the formation of atmospheric organic particulate matter by accretion reactions – Part 3: Carboxylic and dicarboxylic acids, Atmos. Environ., 40, 6676–6686, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2006.03.013, 2006.
Barsanti, K. C., McMurry, P. H., and Smith, J. N.: The potential contribution of organic salts to new particle growth, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 2949–2957, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-9-2949-2009, 2009.
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Short summary
Processes that control the growth of newly formed particles are not well understood and limit predictions of aerosol climate impacts. We combine state-of-the-art measurements at a central-US site with a particle-growth model to investigate the species and processes contributing to growth. Observed growth was dominated by organics, sulfate salts, or a mixture of these two. The model qualitatively captures the variability between different days.
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