Articles | Volume 19, issue 22
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 13759–13771, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-13759-2019

Special issue: The Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) (ACP/GMD inter-journal...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 13759–13771, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-13759-2019

Research article 15 Nov 2019

Research article | 15 Nov 2019

Possible implications of enhanced chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations on ozone

Martin Dameris et al.

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Cited articles

Carpenter, L. J., Reimann, S., Burkholder, J. P., Clerbaux, C., Hall, B. D., Hossaini, R., Laube, J. C., and Yvon-Lewis, S. A.: Update on Ozone-Depleting Substances (ODSs) and other gases of interest to the Montreal Protocol, Chapter 1 in Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2014, Global Ozone Research and Monitoring, Project–Report No. 55, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2014. 
Dameris, M., Godin-Beekmann, S., Alexander, S., Braesicke, P., Chipperfield, M., de Laat, A. T. J., Orsolini, Y., Rex, M., and Santee, M. L.: Update on Polar ozone: Past, present, and future, Chapter 3 in Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2014, Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project – Report No. 55, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2014. 
Engel, A., Strunk, M., Müller, M., Haase, H. P., Poss, C., Levin, I., and Schmidt, U.: Temporal development of total chlorine in the high-latitude stratosphere based on reference distributions of mean age derived from CO2 and SF6, J. Geophys. Res., 107, 4136, https://doi.org/10.1029/2001JD000584, 2002. 
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Short summary
A chemistry–climate model (CCM) study is performed, investigating the consequences of a constant CFC-11 surface mixing ratio for stratospheric ozone in the future. The total column ozone is particularly affected in both polar regions in winter and spring. It turns out that the calculated ozone changes, especially in the upper stratosphere, are smaller than expected. In this attitudinal region the additional ozone depletion due to the catalysis by reactive chlorine is partly compensated for.
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