Articles | Volume 19, issue 22
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 13759–13771, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-13759-2019

Special issue: The Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) (ACP/GMD inter-journal...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 13759–13771, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-13759-2019

Research article 15 Nov 2019

Research article | 15 Nov 2019

Possible implications of enhanced chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations on ozone

Martin Dameris et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Martin Dameris on behalf of the Authors (06 Sep 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Sep 2019) by Jens-Uwe Grooß
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (23 Sep 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (03 Oct 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Oct 2019) by Jens-Uwe Grooß
AR by Martin Dameris on behalf of the Authors (09 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (11 Oct 2019) by Jens-Uwe Grooß
AR by Martin Dameris on behalf of the Authors (15 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
A chemistry–climate model (CCM) study is performed, investigating the consequences of a constant CFC-11 surface mixing ratio for stratospheric ozone in the future. The total column ozone is particularly affected in both polar regions in winter and spring. It turns out that the calculated ozone changes, especially in the upper stratosphere, are smaller than expected. In this attitudinal region the additional ozone depletion due to the catalysis by reactive chlorine is partly compensated for.
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