Articles | Volume 18, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9955–9973, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9955-2018

Special issue: The Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) (ACP/GMD inter-journal...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9955–9973, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9955-2018

Research article 13 Jul 2018

Research article | 13 Jul 2018

Investigating the yield of H2O and H2 from methane oxidation in the stratosphere

Franziska Frank et al.

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Revised manuscript accepted for ACP
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Cited articles

Austin, J., Wilson, J., Li, F., and Vömel, H.: Evolution of Water Vapor Concentrations and Stratospheric Age of Air in Coupled Chemistry-Climate Model Simulations, Am. Meteor. Soc., 905–921, https://doi.org/10.1175/JAS3866.1, 2007.
Boville, B. A., Kiehl, J. T., Rasch, P. J., and Bryan, F. O.: Improvements to the NCAR CSM-1 for Transient Climate Simulations, J. Climate, 14, 164–179, https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0442(2001)014<0164:ITTNCF>2.0.CO;2, 2001.
Chiodo, G. and Polvani, L. M.: Reduced Southern Hemispheric circulation response to quadrupled CO2 due to stratospheric ozone feedback, Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, 465–474, https://doi.org/10.1002/2016GL071011, 2017.
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It is frequently assumed that one methane molecule produces two water molecules. Applying various modeling concepts, we find that the yield of water from methane is vertically not constantly 2. In the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere, transport of intermediate H2 molecules even led to a yield greater than 2. We conclude that for a realistic chemical source of stratospheric water vapor, one must also take other sources (H2), intermediates and the chemical removal of water into account.
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