Articles | Volume 16, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 4631–4639, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-4631-2016

Special issue: Ten years of Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) observations...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 4631–4639, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-4631-2016
Research article
13 Apr 2016
Research article | 13 Apr 2016

Hotspot of glyoxal over the Pearl River delta seen from the OMI satellite instrument: implications for emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons

Christopher Chan Miller et al.

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Cited articles

Alvarado, L. M. A., Richter, A., Vrekoussis, M., Wittrock, F., Hilboll, A., Schreier, S. F., and Burrows, J. P.: An improved glyoxal retrieval from OMI measurements, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 4133–4150, https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-7-4133-2014, 2014.
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Short summary
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursors for photochemical smog. Glyoxal is an organic compound produced in the atmosphere from reactions of larger VOCs. OMI satellite observations of glyoxal show a large hotspot over the Pearl River delta. The hotspot can be explained by industrial paint and solvent emissions of aromatic VOCs. Our work shows OMI observations are consistent with current VOC emissions estimates, whereas previous work has suggested large underestimates.
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