Articles | Volume 16, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 12159–12176, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-12159-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 12159–12176, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-12159-2016
Research article
28 Sep 2016
Research article | 28 Sep 2016

Future Arctic ozone recovery: the importance of chemistry and dynamics

Ewa M. Bednarz et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Future trends in springtime Arctic ozone, and its chemical dynamical and radiative drivers, are analysed using a 7-member ensemble of chemistry–climate model integrations, allowing for a detailed assessment of interannual variability. Despite the future long-term recovery of Arctic ozone, there is large interannual variability and episodic reductions in springtime Arctic column ozone. Halogen chemistry will become a smaller but non-negligible driver of Arctic ozone variability over the century.
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