Articles | Volume 19, issue 10
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-6701-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-6701-2019
Research article
 | 
20 May 2019
Research article |  | 20 May 2019

The unintended consequence of SO2 and NO2 regulations over China: increase of ammonia levels and impact on PM2.5 concentrations

Mathieu Lachatre, Audrey Fortems-Cheiney, Gilles Foret, Guillaume Siour, Gaëlle Dufour, Lieven Clarisse, Cathy Clerbaux, Pierre-François Coheur, Martin Van Damme, and Matthias Beekmann

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Cited articles

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It has been observed from satellite-based instruments that ammonia levels strongly increased between 2011 and 2015. We have used the CHIMERE CTM to understand what could explain such an increase. We first focused on meteorological condition variations, and it has been concluded that meteorology did not explain ammonia evolution. Then, we focused on SO2 and NOx emission evolution rates to evaluate their influences on ammonia. It appears that theses decreases were the main explanation.
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