Articles | Volume 18, issue 16
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12011-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12011-2018
Research article
 | 
22 Aug 2018
Research article |  | 22 Aug 2018

A comparison of posterior atmospheric CO2 adjustments obtained from in situ and GOSAT constrained flux inversions

Saroja M. Polavarapu, Feng Deng, Brendan Byrne, Dylan B. A. Jones, and Michael Neish

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Cited articles

Andres, R. J., Gregg, J. S., Losey, L., Marland, G., and Boden, T. A.: Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption, Tellus B, 63, 309–327, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0889.2011.00530.x, 2011.
Baker, D. F., Doney, S. C., and Schimel, D. S.: Variational data assimilation for atmospheric CO2, Tellus B, 58, 359–365, 2006.
Barnes, E. A., Parazoo, N., Orbe, C., and Denning, A. S.: Isentropic transport and the seasonal cycle amplitude of CO2, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 121, 8106–8124, 2016.
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Short summary
A new diagnostic reveals how fluxes constrained by two different CO2 observing systems inform atmospheric CO2 simulations. The potential for GOSAT data to better resolve zonally asymmetric structures in the tropics year-round and in the northern extratropics in most seasons is shown. Using in situ data yields a better match to independent observations on the global, annual scale. Such complementarity of the observing systems can be exploited in greenhouse gas data assimilation systems.
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