Articles | Volume 15, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 13647–13663, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-13647-2015

Special issue: The EU Project SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 13647–13663, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-13647-2015

Research article 10 Dec 2015

Research article | 10 Dec 2015

Oceanic bromoform emissions weighted by their ozone depletion potential

S. Tegtmeier et al.

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Cited articles

Aschmann, J. and Sinnhuber, B.-M.: Contribution of very short-lived substances to stratospheric bromine loading: uncertainties and constraints, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 1203–1219, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-1203-2013, 2013.
Austin, J. N. and Butchart, N.: Coupled chemistry-climate model simulations for the period 1980 to 2020: ozone depletion and the start of ozone recovery, Q. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 129, 3225–3249, 2003.
Braesicke, P., Keeble, J., Yang, X., Stiller, G., Kellmann, S., Abraham, N. L., Archibald, A., Telford, P., and Pyle, J. A.: Circulation anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere and ozone changes, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 10677–10688, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-10677-2013, 2013.
Brioude, J., Portmann, R. W., Daniel, J. S., Cooper, O. R., Frost, G. J., Rosenlof, K. H., Granier, C., Ravishankara, A. R., Montzka, S. A., and Stohl, A.: Variations in ozone depletion potentials of very short-lived substances with season and emission region, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L19804, https://doi.org/10.1029/2010GL044856, 2010.
Butchart, N.: The Brewer-Dobson circulation, Rev. Geophys., 52, 157–184, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013RG000448, 2014.
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Short summary
At present, man-made halogens and natural oceanic substances both contribute to the observed ozone depletion. Emissions of the anthropogenic halogens have been reduced, whereas emissions of the natural substances are expected to increase in future climate due to anthropogenic activities affecting oceanic processes. We assess the impact of these oceanic substances on ozone by weighting their emissions with their potential to destroy ozone for current conditions and future projections.
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