Articles | Volume 19, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 13519–13533, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-13519-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 13519–13533, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-13519-2019

Research article 06 Nov 2019

Research article | 06 Nov 2019

The control of anthropogenic emissions contributed to 80 % of the decrease in PM2.5 concentrations in Beijing from 2013 to 2017

Ziyue Chen et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
We employed Kolmogorov–Zurbenko filtering and WRF-CMAQ to quantify the relative contribution of meteorological variations and emission reduction to PM2.5 reduction in Beijing from 2013 to 2017, which is crucial to evaluate the Five-year Clean Air Action Plan. Both models suggested that despite favourable meteorological conditions, the control of anthropogenic emissions accounted for around 80 % of PM2.5 reduction in Beijing. Therefore, such a long-term clean air plan should be continued.
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