Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2035–2047, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2035-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2035–2047, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2035-2018

Research article 13 Feb 2018

Research article | 13 Feb 2018

Predicting decadal trends in cloud droplet number concentration using reanalysis and satellite data

Daniel T. McCoy et al.

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The interaction between clouds and aerosols represents the largest source of uncertainty in the anthropogenic radiative forcing. Cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is the state variable that moderates the interaction between aerosol and clouds. Here we show that CDNC decreases off the coasts of East Asia and North America due to controls on emissions. We support this analysis through an examination of volcanism in Hawaii and Vanuatu.
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