Articles | Volume 18, issue 22
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 16461–16480, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-16461-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 16461–16480, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-16461-2018
Research article
21 Nov 2018
Research article | 21 Nov 2018

The effect of secondary ice production parameterization on the simulation of a cold frontal rainband

Sylvia C. Sullivan et al.

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Short summary
Ice crystal formation in clouds can occur via thermodynamic nucleation, but also via mechanical collisions between pre-existing crystals or co-existing droplets. When descriptions of this mechanical ice generation are implemented into the COSMO weather model, we find that the contributions to crystal number from thermodynamic and mechanical processes are of the same order. Mechanical ice generation also intensifies differences in precipitation intensity between dynamic and quiescent regions.
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