Articles | Volume 19, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 5331–5347, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5331-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 5331–5347, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5331-2019
Research article
18 Apr 2019
Research article | 18 Apr 2019

Constraining the aerosol influence on cloud liquid water path

Edward Gryspeerdt et al.

Related authors

Addressing the difficulties in quantifying droplet number response to aerosol from satellite observations
Hailing Jia, Johannes Quaas, Edward Gryspeerdt, Christoph Böhm, and Odran Sourdeval
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 7353–7372, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7353-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7353-2022, 2022
Short summary
Observing short timescale cloud development to constrain aerosol-cloud interactions
Edward Gryspeerdt, Franziska Glassmeier, Graham Feingold, Fabian Hoffmann, and Rebecca J. Murray-Watson
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-335,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-335, 2022
Preprint under review for ACP
Short summary
Stability-dependent increases in liquid water with droplet number in the Arctic
Rebecca J. Murray-Watson and Edward Gryspeerdt
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 5743–5756, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5743-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5743-2022, 2022
Short summary
Aviation contrail climate effects in the North Atlantic from 2016–2021
Roger Teoh, Ulrich Schumann, Edward Gryspeerdt, Marc Shapiro, Jarlath Molloy, George Koudis, Christiane Voigt, and Marc Stettler
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-169,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-169, 2022
Revised manuscript accepted for ACP
Short summary
Opportunistic experiments to constrain aerosol effective radiative forcing
Matthew W. Christensen, Andrew Gettelman, Jan Cermak, Guy Dagan, Michael Diamond, Alyson Douglas, Graham Feingold, Franziska Glassmeier, Tom Goren, Daniel P. Grosvenor, Edward Gryspeerdt, Ralph Kahn, Zhanqing Li, Po-Lun Ma, Florent Malavelle, Isabel L. McCoy, Daniel T. McCoy, Greg McFarquhar, Johannes Mülmenstädt, Sandip Pal, Anna Possner, Adam Povey, Johannes Quaas, Daniel Rosenfeld, Anja Schmidt, Roland Schrödner, Armin Sorooshian, Philip Stier, Velle Toll, Duncan Watson-Parris, Robert Wood, Mingxi Yang, and Tianle Yuan
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 641–674, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-641-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-641-2022, 2022
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Clouds and Precipitation | Research Activity: Remote Sensing | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
A Lagrangian analysis of pockets of open cells over the southeastern Pacific
Kevin M. Smalley, Matthew D. Lebsock, Ryan Eastman, Mark Smalley, and Mikael K. Witte
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 8197–8219, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-8197-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-8197-2022, 2022
Short summary
The formation and composition of the Mount Everest plume in winter
Edward E. Hindman and Scott Lindstrom
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 7995–8008, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7995-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7995-2022, 2022
Short summary
New insights on the prevalence of drizzle in marine stratocumulus clouds based on a machine learning algorithm applied to radar Doppler spectra
Zeen Zhu, Pavlos Kollias, Edward Luke, and Fan Yang
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 7405–7416, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7405-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7405-2022, 2022
Short summary
Addressing the difficulties in quantifying droplet number response to aerosol from satellite observations
Hailing Jia, Johannes Quaas, Edward Gryspeerdt, Christoph Böhm, and Odran Sourdeval
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 7353–7372, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7353-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7353-2022, 2022
Short summary
Optically thin clouds in the trades
Theresa Mieslinger, Bjorn Stevens, Tobias Kölling, Manfred Brath, Martin Wirth, and Stefan A. Buehler
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6879–6898, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6879-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6879-2022, 2022
Short summary

Cited articles

Ackerman, A. S., Toon, O. B., Taylor, J. P., Johnson, D. W., Hobbs, P. V., and Ferek, R. J.: Effects of Aerosols on Cloud Albedo: Evaluation of Twomey's Parameterization of Cloud Susceptibility Using Measurements of Ship Tracks, J. Atmos. Sci., 57, 2684–2695, https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0469(2000)057<2684:EOAOCA>2.0.CO;2, 2000. a
Ackerman, A. S., Kirkpatrick, M. P., Stevens, D. E., and Toon, O. B.: The impact of humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432, 1014–1017, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature03174, 2004. a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i
Albrecht, B. A.: Aerosols, Cloud Microphysics, and Fractional Cloudiness, Science, 245, 1227–1230, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.245.4923.1227, 1989. a, b
Anderberg, M.: Cluster analysis for applications, Elsevier, New York, 1973. a
Andersen, H., Cermak, J., Fuchs, J., Knutti, R., and Lohmann, U.: Understanding the drivers of marine liquid-water cloud occurrence and properties with global observations using neural networks, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 9535–9546, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9535-2017, 2017. a
Download
Short summary
The liquid water path (LWP) is the strongest control on cloud albedo, such that a small change in LWP can have a large radiative impact. By changing the droplet number concentration (Nd) aerosols may be able to change the LWP, but the sign and magnitude of the effect is unclear. This work uses satellite data to investigate the relationship between Nd and LWP at a global scale and in response to large aerosol perturbations, suggesting that a strong decrease in LWP at high Nd may be overestimated.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint