Articles | Volume 14, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-2679-2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-2679-2014
Research article
 | 
14 Mar 2014
Research article |  | 14 Mar 2014

Atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN): a global budget and source attribution

E. V. Fischer, D. J. Jacob, R. M. Yantosca, M. P. Sulprizio, D. B. Millet, J. Mao, F. Paulot, H. B. Singh, A. Roiger, L. Ries, R.W. Talbot, K. Dzepina, and S. Pandey Deolal

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