Articles | Volume 18, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15975–16003, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15975-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15975–16003, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15975-2018

Research article 07 Nov 2018

Research article | 07 Nov 2018

On the role of thermal expansion and compression in large-scale atmospheric energy and mass transports

Melville E. Nicholls and Roger A. Pielke Sr.

Related authors

A numerical modelling study of the physical mechanisms causing radiation to accelerate tropical cyclogenesisand cause diurnal cycles
Melville E. Nicholls, Warren P. Smith, Roger A. Pielke Sr., Stephen M. Saleeby, and Norman B. Wood
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-569,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-569, 2019
Preprint withdrawn
Short summary
A numerical modelling investigation of the role of diabatic heating and cooling in the development of a mid-level vortex prior to tropical cyclogenesis – Part 1: The response to stratiform components of diabatic forcing
Melville E. Nicholls, Roger A. Pielke Sr., Donavan Wheeler, Gustavo Carrio, and Warren P. Smith
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14393–14416, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14393-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14393-2018, 2018
Short summary
An investigation of how radiation may cause accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and diurnal cycles of convective activity
M. E. Nicholls
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 9003–9029, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-9003-2015,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-9003-2015, 2015
An examination of two pathways to tropical cyclogenesis occurring in idealized simulations with a cloud-resolving numerical model
M. E. Nicholls and M. T. Montgomery
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 5999–6022, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-5999-2013,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-5999-2013, 2013

Related subject area

Subject: Dynamics | Research Activity: Atmospheric Modelling | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
Very long-period oscillations in the atmosphere (0–110 km)
Dirk Offermann, Christoph Kalicinsky, Ralf Koppmann, and Johannes Wintel
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 1593–1611, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1593-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-1593-2021, 2021
Short summary
Identification of molecular cluster evaporation rates, cluster formation enthalpies and entropies by Monte Carlo method
Anna Shcherbacheva, Tracey Balehowsky, Jakub Kubečka, Tinja Olenius, Tapio Helin, Heikki Haario, Marko Laine, Theo Kurtén, and Hanna Vehkamäki
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 15867–15906, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15867-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15867-2020, 2020
Short summary
The “urban meteorology island”: a multi-model ensemble analysis
Jan Karlický, Peter Huszár, Tereza Nováková, Michal Belda, Filip Švábik, Jana Ďoubalová, and Tomáš Halenka
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 15061–15077, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15061-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15061-2020, 2020
Short summary
Validation of reanalysis Southern Ocean atmosphere trends using sea ice data
William R. Hobbs, Andrew R. Klekociuk, and Yuhang Pan
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 14757–14768, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-14757-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-14757-2020, 2020
Short summary
Revisiting the trend in the occurrences of the “warm Arctic–cold Eurasian continent” temperature pattern
Lejiang Yu, Shiyuan Zhong, Cuijuan Sui, and Bo Sun
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 13753–13770, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13753-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13753-2020, 2020
Short summary

Cited articles

Adams-Selin, R. D. and Johnson, R. H.: Examination of gravity waves associated with the 13 March 2003 bow echo, Mon. Weather Rev., 141, 3735–3756, 2013. 
Beer, T.: Atmospheric waves, 300 pp., John Wiley, New York, 1974. 
Bowman, H. S. and Bedard Jr., A. J.: Observations of infrasound and subsonic disturbances related to severe weather, Geophys. J. Roy. Astron. Soc., 26, 215–242, 1971. 
Bretherton, C. S. and Smolarkiewicz, P. K.: Gravity waves, compensating subsidence and detrainment around cumulus clouds, J. Atmos. Sci., 46, 740–759, 1989. 
Bryan, G. H. and Parker, M. D.: Observations of a squall line and its near environment using high-frequency rawinsonde launches during VORTEX2, Mon. Weather Rev., 138, 4076–4097, 2010. 
Download
Short summary
The current understanding of atmospheric energy and mass transports is that the general circulation moves energy and mass from place to place in a relatively slow manner at the speed of the winds. This study challenges this view and provides evidence that considerable transfer can occur at the speed of sound. This transport mechanism is probably not adequately represented in current global models, which potentially could be a source of error that has yet to be evaluated.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint