Articles | Volume 15, issue 10
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 5381–5403, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-5381-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 5381–5403, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-5381-2015
Research article
19 May 2015
Research article | 19 May 2015

Polar processing in a split vortex: Arctic ozone loss in early winter 2012/2013

G. L. Manney et al.

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Subject: Gases | Research Activity: Remote Sensing | Altitude Range: Stratosphere | Science Focus: Chemistry (chemical composition and reactions)
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Cited articles

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Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) cause a rapid rise in lower stratospheric temperatures, terminating conditions favorable to chemical ozone loss. We show that although temperatures rose precipitously during the vortex split SSW in early Jan 2013, because the offspring vortices each remained isolated and in regions that received sunlight, chemical ozone loss continued for over 1 month after the SSW. Dec/Jan Arctic ozone loss was larger than any previously observed during that period.
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