Articles | Volume 22, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 4705–4719, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4705-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 4705–4719, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-4705-2022
Research article
11 Apr 2022
Research article | 11 Apr 2022

North China Plain as a hot spot of ozone pollution exacerbated by extreme high temperatures

Pinya Wang et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
China is now suffering from both severe ozone (O3) pollution and heat events. We highlight that North China Plain is the hot spot of the co-occurrences of extremes in O3 and high temperatures in China. Such coupled extremes exhibit an increasing trend during 2014–2019 and will continue to increase until the middle of this century. And the coupled extremes impose more severe health impacts to human than O3 pollution occurring alone because of elevated O3 levels and temperatures.
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