Articles | Volume 19, issue 6
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 3557–3578, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-3557-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 3557–3578, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-3557-2019
Research article
20 Mar 2019
Research article | 20 Mar 2019

Saharan dust and biomass burning aerosols during ex-hurricane Ophelia: observations from the new UK lidar and sun-photometer network

Martin Osborne et al.

Related authors

Including ash in UKESM1 model simulations of the Raikoke volcanic eruption reveal improved agreement with observations
Alice F. Wells, Andy Jones, Martin Osborne, Lilly Damany-Pearce, Daniel G. Partridge, and James M. Haywood
EGUsphere, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-1060,https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-1060, 2022
Short summary
The 2019 Raikoke volcanic eruption – Part 2: Particle-phase dispersion and concurrent wildfire smoke emissions
Martin J. Osborne, Johannes de Leeuw, Claire Witham, Anja Schmidt, Frances Beckett, Nina Kristiansen, Joelle Buxmann, Cameron Saint, Ellsworth J. Welton, Javier Fochesatto, Ana R. Gomes, Ulrich Bundke, Andreas Petzold, Franco Marenco, and Jim Haywood
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 2975–2997, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-2975-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-2975-2022, 2022
Short summary
Characterizing the performance of a POPS miniaturized optical particle counter when operated on a quadcopter drone
Zixia Liu, Martin Osborne, Karen Anderson, Jamie D. Shutler, Andy Wilson, Justin Langridge, Steve H. L. Yim, Hugh Coe, Suresh Babu, Sreedharan K. Satheesh, Paquita Zuidema, Tao Huang, Jack C. H. Cheng, and James Haywood
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 14, 6101–6118, https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-6101-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-6101-2021, 2021
Short summary
The 2019 Raikoke volcanic eruption – Part 1: Dispersion model simulations and satellite retrievals of volcanic sulfur dioxide
Johannes de Leeuw, Anja Schmidt, Claire S. Witham, Nicolas Theys, Isabelle A. Taylor, Roy G. Grainger, Richard J. Pope, Jim Haywood, Martin Osborne, and Nina I. Kristiansen
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 10851–10879, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-10851-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-10851-2021, 2021
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Aerosols | Research Activity: Remote Sensing | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
South American 2020 regional smoke plume: intercomparison with previous years, impact on solar radiation, and the role of Pantanal biomass burning season
Nilton Évora do Rosário, Elisa Thomé Sena, and Marcia Akemi Yamasoe
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15021–15033, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15021-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15021-2022, 2022
Short summary
Circular polarization in atmospheric aerosols
Santiago Gassó and Kirk D. Knobelspiesse
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 13581–13605, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-13581-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-13581-2022, 2022
Short summary
Spatiotemporal continuous estimates of daily 1 km PM2.5 from 2000 to present under the Tracking Air Pollution in China (TAP) framework
Qingyang Xiao, Guannan Geng, Shigan Liu, Jiajun Liu, Xia Meng, and Qiang Zhang
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 13229–13242, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-13229-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-13229-2022, 2022
Short summary
Aerosol optical depth regime over Megacities of the world
Kyriakoula Papachristopoulou, Ioannis-Panagiotis Raptis, Antonis Gkikas, Ilias Fountoulakis, Akriti Masoom, and Stelios Kazadzis
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-617,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-617, 2022
Revised manuscript accepted for ACP
Short summary
Robust evidence for reversal of the trend in aerosol effective climate forcing
Johannes Quaas, Hailing Jia, Chris Smith, Anna Lea Albright, Wenche Aas, Nicolas Bellouin, Olivier Boucher, Marie Doutriaux-Boucher, Piers M. Forster, Daniel Grosvenor, Stuart Jenkins, Zbigniew Klimont, Norman G. Loeb, Xiaoyan Ma, Vaishali Naik, Fabien Paulot, Philip Stier, Martin Wild, Gunnar Myhre, and Michael Schulz
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 12221–12239, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-12221-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-12221-2022, 2022
Short summary

Cited articles

Adam, M., Buxmann, J., Freeman, N., Horseman, A., Slamon, C., Sugier, J., and Bennett, R.: The UK Lidar-Sunphotometer Operational Volcanic Ash Monitoring Network, in: Proceedings of the 28th International Laser Radar Conference, 2017. a, b
Alados-Arboledas, L., Müller, D., Guerrero-Rascado, J. L., Navas-Guzmán, F., Pérez-Ramírez, D., and Olmo, F. J.: Optical and microphysical properties of fresh biomass burning aerosol retrieved by Raman lidar, and star-and sun-photometry, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L01807, https://doi.org/10.1029/2010GL045999, 2011. a
Ansmann, A., Riebesell, M., and Weitkamp, C.: Measurement of atmospheric aerosol extinction profiles with a Raman lidar, Opt. Lett., 15, 746–748, https://doi.org/10.1364/OL.15.000746, 1990. a, b
Ansmann, A., Wandinger, U., Riebesell, M., Weitkamp, C., and Michaelis, W.: Independent measurement of extinction and backscatter profiles in cirrus clouds by using a combined Raman elastic-backscatter lidar, Appl. Opt., 31, 7113–7131, https://doi.org/10.1364/AO.31.007113, 1992. a, b, c, d
Ansmann, A., Baars, H., Tesche, M., Müller, D., Althausen, D., Engelmann, R., Pauliquevis, T., and Artaxo, P.: Dust and smoke transport from Africa to South America: Lidar profiling over Cape Verde and the Amazon rainforest, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L11802, https://doi.org/10.1029/2009GL037923, 2009. a
Download
Short summary
In this paper we present an analysis of the unusual red sky event that occurred over the UK on 15 and 16 October 2017. We use measurements from the Met Office operational lidar and sun-photometer network, as well as other data and model output, to show that the event was caused by the passage of ex-hurricane Ophelia which transported unusual amounts of dust from the Sahara to the UK as well as smoke from forest fires in Portugal.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint