Articles | Volume 19, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 12797–12809, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12797-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 12797–12809, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12797-2019
Research article
14 Oct 2019
Research article | 14 Oct 2019

Secondary organic aerosol formation from the laboratory oxidation of biomass burning emissions

Christopher Y. Lim et al.

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Cited articles

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Wildfires are a large source of gases and particles to the atmosphere, both of which impact human health and climate. The amount and composition of particles from wildfires can change with time in the atmosphere; however, the impact of aging is not well understood. In a series of controlled laboratory experiments, we show that the particles are oxidized and a significant fraction of the gas-phase carbon (24 %–56 %) is converted to particle mass over the course of several days in the atmosphere.
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