Articles | Volume 19, issue 19
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12797-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12797-2019
Research article
 | 
14 Oct 2019
Research article |  | 14 Oct 2019

Secondary organic aerosol formation from the laboratory oxidation of biomass burning emissions

Christopher Y. Lim, David H. Hagan, Matthew M. Coggon, Abigail R. Koss, Kanako Sekimoto, Joost de Gouw, Carsten Warneke, Christopher D. Cappa, and Jesse H. Kroll
Publisher's note: the Supplement was exchanged on 28 April 2023.

In the original version of the Supplement, the authors had mistakenly published primary organic aerosol (POA) values that were not corrected for AMS collection efficiency. The error is limited to Table S1 and Figure S9b in the Supplement and does not impact any other figures or conclusions in the paper. In the attached version of the Supplement, the authors have edited Table S1 and Figure S9b to use the properly corrected POA values.

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Short summary
Wildfires are a large source of gases and particles to the atmosphere, both of which impact human health and climate. The amount and composition of particles from wildfires can change with time in the atmosphere; however, the impact of aging is not well understood. In a series of controlled laboratory experiments, we show that the particles are oxidized and a significant fraction of the gas-phase carbon (24 %–56 %) is converted to particle mass over the course of several days in the atmosphere.
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