Articles | Volume 17, issue 10
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6353–6371, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6353-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6353–6371, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6353-2017
Research article
29 May 2017
Research article | 29 May 2017

A new mechanism for atmospheric mercury redox chemistry: implications for the global mercury budget

Hannah M. Horowitz et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Mercury is a toxic, global pollutant released to the air from human activities like coal burning. Chemical reactions in air determine how far mercury is transported before it is deposited to the environment, where it may be converted to a form that accumulates in fish. We use a 3-D atmospheric model to evaluate a new set of chemical reactions and its effects on mercury deposition. We find it is consistent with observations and leads to increased deposition to oceans, especially in the tropics.
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