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Volume 16, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 2803–2817, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-2803-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 2803–2817, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-2803-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 04 Mar 2016

Research article | 04 Mar 2016

Estimates of free-tropospheric NO2 and HCHO mixing ratios derived from high-altitude mountain MAX-DOAS observations at midlatitudes and in the tropics

Stefan F. Schreier et al.

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Cited articles

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Choi, S., Joiner, J., Choi, Y., Duncan, B. N., Vasilkov, A., Krotkov, N., and Bucsela, E.: First estimates of global free-tropospheric NO2 abundances derived using a cloud-slicing technique applied to satellite observations from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10565–10588, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-10565-2014, 2014.
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Mixing ratios of NO2 and HCHO in the free troposphere are obtained from MAX-DOAS measurements at two mountain stations at midlatitudes and in the tropics using a modified geometrical approach. The method is applied in the UV wavelength range and, thus, allows the detection of HCHO mixing ratios, in addition to NO2. We find that mixing ratios of both species are increased in the tropical free troposphere due to biomass burning.
Mixing ratios of NO2 and HCHO in the free troposphere are obtained from MAX-DOAS measurements at...
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