Articles | Volume 19, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 11383–11399, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-11383-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 11383–11399, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-11383-2019

Research article 10 Sep 2019

Research article | 10 Sep 2019

A double ITCZ phenomenology of wind errors in the equatorial Atlantic in seasonal forecasts with ECMWF models

Jonathan K. P. Shonk et al.

Related authors

Future changes in Beijing haze events under different anthropogenic aerosol emission scenarios
Lixia Zhang, Laura J. Wilcox, Nick J. Dunstone, David J. Paynter, Shuai Hu, Massimo Bollasina, Donghuan Li, Jonathan K. P. Shonk, and Liwei Zou
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 7499–7514, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-7499-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-7499-2021, 2021
Short summary
Uncertainty in aerosol radiative forcing impacts the simulated global monsoon in the 20th century
Jonathan K. P. Shonk, Andrew G. Turner, Amulya Chevuturi, Laura J. Wilcox, Andrea J. Dittus, and Ed Hawkins
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 14903–14915, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-14903-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-14903-2020, 2020
Short summary
The impact of neglecting ice phase on cloud optical depth retrievals from AERONET cloud mode observations
Jonathan K. P. Shonk, Jui-Yuan Christine Chiu, Alexander Marshak, David M. Giles, Chiung-Huei Huang, Gerald G. Mace, Sally Benson, Ilya Slutsker, and Brent N. Holben
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 12, 5087–5099, https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-5087-2019,https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-5087-2019, 2019
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Dynamics | Research Activity: Atmospheric Modelling | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
The potential for geostationary remote sensing of NO2 to improve weather prediction
Xueling Liu, Arthur P. Mizzi, Jeffrey L. Anderson, Inez Fung, and Ronald C. Cohen
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 9573–9583, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9573-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9573-2021, 2021
Short summary
Robust winter warming over Eurasia under stratospheric sulfate geoengineering – the role of stratospheric dynamics
Antara Banerjee, Amy H. Butler, Lorenzo M. Polvani, Alan Robock, Isla R. Simpson, and Lantao Sun
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 6985–6997, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6985-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6985-2021, 2021
Short summary
Parameterizing the vertical downward dispersion of ship exhaust gas in the near field
Ronny Badeke, Volker Matthias, and David Grawe
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5935–5951, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5935-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5935-2021, 2021
Short summary
Anthropogenic aerosol forcing of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and the associated mechanisms in CMIP6 models
Taufiq Hassan, Robert J. Allen, Wei Liu, and Cynthia A. Randles
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5821–5846, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5821-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5821-2021, 2021
Short summary
Sensitivities of the Madden–Julian oscillation forecasts to configurations of physics in the ECMWF global model
Jun-Ichi Yano and Nils P. Wedi
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4759–4778, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4759-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4759-2021, 2021
Short summary

Cited articles

Balmaseda, M. A., Mogensen, K., and Weaver, A. T.: Evaluation of the ECMWF Ocean Reanalysis System ORAS4, Q. J. Roy. Meteorol. Soc. 139, 1132–1161. 2013. 
Breugem, W. P., Chang, P., Jang, C. J., Mignot, J., and Hazeleger, W.: Barrier Layers and Tropical Atlantic SST Biases in Coupled GCMs, Tellus A, 60, 885–897, 2008. 
Carvalho, L. M. V., Jones, C., Silva, A. E., Liebmann, B., and Silva Dias, P. L.: The South American Monsoon System and the 1970s Climate Transition, Int. J. Climatol., 31, 1238–1256, 2011. 
Chang, C. Y., Carton, J. A., Grodsky, S. A., and Nigam, S.: Seasonal Climate of the Tropical Atlantic Sector in the NCAR Community Climate System Model 3: Error Structure and Probable Causes of Errors, J. Climate, 20, 1053–1070, 2007. 
Chang, C. Y., Nigam, S., and Carton, J. A.: Origin of the Springtime Westerly Bias in Equatorial Atlantic Surface Winds in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3) Simulation, J. Climate, 21, 4766–4778, 2008. 
Download
Short summary
Modern climate models are affected by systematic biases that harm their ability to produce reliable seasonal forecasts and climate projections. In this study, we investigate causes of biases in wind patterns over the tropical Atlantic during northern spring in three related models. We find that the wind biases are associated with an increase in excess rainfall and convergence in the tropical western Atlantic at the start of April, leading to the redirection of trade winds away from the Equator.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint