Articles | Volume 15, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 2247–2268, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-2247-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 2247–2268, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-2247-2015

Research article 02 Mar 2015

Research article | 02 Mar 2015

Aerosol size distribution and radiative forcing response to anthropogenically driven historical changes in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

S. D. D'Andrea et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
We use modeled estimates of BVOCs from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic BVOC emission changes on SOA formation, aerosol size distributions, and radiative effects using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS model. Changes of >25% in the number of particles with diameters >80nm are predicted regionally due to extensive land-use changes, leading to increases in combined radiative effect of >0.5 Wm-2. This change in radiative forcing could be an overlooked anthropogenic effect on climate.
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