Articles | Volume 20, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 7335–7358, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-7335-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 7335–7358, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-7335-2020

Research article 25 Jun 2020

Research article | 25 Jun 2020

Evaluating the impact of blowing-snow sea salt aerosol on springtime BrO and O3 in the Arctic

Jiayue Huang et al.

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Short summary
Large-scale enhancements of tropospheric BrO and the depletion of surface ozone are often observed in the springtime Arctic. Here, we use a chemical transport model to examine the role of sea salt aerosol from blowing snow in explaining these phenomena. We find that our simulation can account for the spatiotemporal variability of satellite observations of BrO. However, the model has difficulty in producing the magnitude of observed ozone depletion events.
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