Articles | Volume 17, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 4477–4491, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-4477-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 4477–4491, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-4477-2017

Research article 03 Apr 2017

Research article | 03 Apr 2017

Impacts of coal burning on ambient PM2.5 pollution in China

Qiao Ma et al.

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In order to quantitatively identify the contributions of coal combustion to airborne fine particles, we developed an emission inventory using up-to-date information and conducted simulations using an atmospheric model. Results show that coal combustion contributes 40 % of the airborne fine-particle concentration on national average in China. Among the subsectors of coal combustion, industrial coal burning is the dominant contributor, which should be prioritized when policies are applied.
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