Articles | Volume 21, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 13593–13608, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-13593-2021

Special issue: Ice nucleation in the boreal atmosphere

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 13593–13608, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-13593-2021

Research article 13 Sep 2021

Research article | 13 Sep 2021

Supercooled liquid water and secondary ice production in Kelvin–Helmholtz instability as revealed by radar Doppler spectra observations

Haoran Li et al.

Related authors

Two-year statistics of columnar-ice production in stratiform clouds over Hyytiälä, Finland: environmental conditions and the relevance to secondary ice production
Haoran Li, Ottmar Möhler, Tuukka Petäjä, and Dmitri Moisseev
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14671–14686, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14671-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14671-2021, 2021
Short summary
Towards the connection between snow microphysics and melting layer: insights from multifrequency and dual-polarization radar observations during BAECC
Haoran Li, Jussi Tiira, Annakaisa von Lerber, and Dmitri Moisseev
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 9547–9562, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9547-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9547-2020, 2020
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Clouds and Precipitation | Research Activity: Field Measurements | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
Estimation of the terms acting on local 1 h surface temperature variations in Paris region: the specific contribution of clouds
Oscar Javier Rojas Muñoz, Marjolaine Chiriaco, Sophie Bastin, and Justine Ringard
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 15699–15723, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15699-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-15699-2021, 2021
Short summary
Contrasting characteristics of open- and closed-cellular stratocumulus cloud in the eastern North Atlantic
Michael P. Jensen, Virendra P. Ghate, Dié Wang, Diana K. Apoznanski, Mary J. Bartholomew, Scott E. Giangrande, Karen L. Johnson, and Mandana M. Thieman
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14557–14571, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14557-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14557-2021, 2021
Short summary
Mass and density of individual frozen hydrometeors
Karlie N. Rees, Dhiraj K. Singh, Eric R. Pardyjak, and Timothy J. Garrett
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14235–14250, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14235-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14235-2021, 2021
Short summary
Linear relationship between effective radius and precipitation water content near the top of convective clouds: measurement results from ACRIDICON–CHUVA campaign
Ramon Campos Braga, Daniel Rosenfeld, Ovid O. Krüger, Barbara Ervens, Bruna A. Holanda, Manfred Wendisch, Trismono Krisna, Ulrich Pöschl, Meinrat O. Andreae, Christiane Voigt, and Mira L. Pöhlker
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14079–14088, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14079-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14079-2021, 2021
Short summary
Morning boundary layer conditions for shallow to deep convective cloud evolution during the dry season in the central Amazon
Alice Henkes, Gilberto Fisch, Luiz A. T. Machado, and Jean-Pierre Chaboureau
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 13207–13225, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-13207-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-13207-2021, 2021
Short summary

Cited articles

Baker, M.: Cloud microphysics and climate, Science, 276, 1072–1078, 1997. a
Baker, M. B. and Peter, T.: Small-scale cloud processes and climate, Nature, 451, 299–300, 2008. a
Barnes, H. C., Zagrodnik, J. P., McMurdie, L. A., Rowe, A. K., and Houze Jr, R. A.: Kelvin–Helmholtz Waves in Precipitating Midlatitude Cyclones, J. Atmos. Sci., 75, 2763–2785, 2018. a, b, c, d
Barrett, A. I., Hogan, R. J., and Forbes, R. M.: Why are mixed-phase altocumulus clouds poorly predicted by large-scale models?, Part 1. Physical processes, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 122, 9903–9926, 2017. a, b, c
Chin, H.-N. S., Rodriguez, D. J., Cederwall, R. T., Chuang, C. C., Grossman, A. S., Yio, J. J., Fu, Q., and Miller, M. A.: A microphysical retrieval scheme for continental low-level stratiform clouds: Impacts of the subadiabatic character on microphysical properties and radiation budgets, Mon. Weather Rev., 128, 2511–2527, 2000. a
Download
Short summary
Kelvin–Helmholtz (K–H) clouds embedded in a stratiform precipitation event were uncovered via radar Doppler spectral analysis. Given the unprecedented detail of the observations, we show that multiple populations of secondary ice columns were generated in the pockets where larger cloud droplets are formed and not at some constant level within the cloud. Our results highlight that the K–H instability is favorable for liquid droplet growth and secondary ice formation.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint