Articles | Volume 20, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-1641-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-1641-2020
Research article
 | 
10 Feb 2020
Research article |  | 10 Feb 2020

FLEXPART v10.1 simulation of source contributions to Arctic black carbon

Chunmao Zhu, Yugo Kanaya, Masayuki Takigawa, Kohei Ikeda, Hiroshi Tanimoto, Fumikazu Taketani, Takuma Miyakawa, Hideki Kobayashi, and Ignacio Pisso

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Black carbon is believed to be one of the causes of the rapid warming and glacier melting in the Arctic. The results of our study show that processes associated with the petroleum industry, such as gas flaring in Russia, are the main BC source at the Arctic surface. Emissions in East Asia are the main BC sources at high altitudes in the Arctic. Wildfires in Siberia, Alaska, and Canada are another important Arctic BC source in summer.
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