Articles | Volume 17, issue 7
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-4565-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-4565-2017
Research article
 | 
06 Apr 2017
Research article |  | 06 Apr 2017

A 15-year record of CO emissions constrained by MOPITT CO observations

Zhe Jiang, John R. Worden, Helen Worden, Merritt Deeter, Dylan B. A. Jones, Avelino F. Arellano, and Daven K. Henze

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Andela, N. and van der Werf, G.: Recent trends in African fires driven by cropland expansion and El Nin no to La Ni na transition, Nature Climate Change 4, 791–795, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2313, 2014.
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Short summary
We constrain the long-term variation in global CO emissions for 2001–2015. Our results confirm that the decreasing trend of tropospheric CO in the Northern Hemisphere is due to decreasing CO emissions from anthropogenic and biomass burning sources. In particular, we find decreasing CO emissions from the United States and China in the past 15 years, unchanged anthropogenic CO emissions from Europe since 2008, and likely a positive trend from India and southeast Asia.
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