Articles | Volume 16, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 8431–8446, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-8431-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 8431–8446, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-8431-2016
Research article
12 Jul 2016
Research article | 12 Jul 2016

Measurements of non-volatile aerosols with a VTDMA and their correlations with carbonaceous aerosols in Guangzhou, China

Heidi H. Y. Cheung et al.

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Cited articles

Andreae, M. O., Schmid, O., Yang, H., Chand, D., Zhen Yu, J., Zeng, L.-M., and Zhang, Y.-H.: Optical properties and chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol in urban Guangzhou, China, Atmos. Environ., 42, 6335–6350, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2008.01.030, 2008.
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Brooks, B. J., Smith, M. H., Hill, M. K., and O'Dowd, C. D.: Size-differentiated volatility analysis of internally mixed laboratory-generated aerosol, J. Aerosol Sci., 33, 555-579, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0021-8502(01)00192-6, 2002.
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We present simultaneous measurements of aerosol volatility and carbonaceous matters in Guangzhou, China, in Feb and Mar 2014 using a VTDMA and OC / EC analyzer. Low volatility particles with no significant evaporation at 300° C in the VTDMA contributed 5–15 % of number concentrations of the 40–300 nm particles. Mass closure suggests that non-volatile organic carbon, in addition to elemental carbon, was one of the components of the non-volatile residuals measured by the VTDMA in this study.
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