Articles | Volume 21, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 10851–10879, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-10851-2021

Special issue: Satellite observations, in situ measurements and model simulations...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 10851–10879, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-10851-2021
Research article
19 Jul 2021
Research article | 19 Jul 2021

The 2019 Raikoke volcanic eruption – Part 1: Dispersion model simulations and satellite retrievals of volcanic sulfur dioxide

Johannes de Leeuw et al.

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Cited articles

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Ashfold, M. J., Latif, M. T., Samah, A. A., Mead, M. I., and Harris, N. R. P.: Influence of Northeast Monsoon cold surges on air quality in Southeast Asia, Atmos. Environ., 166, 498–509, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.07.047, 2017. a
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Bernard, A. and Rose, W. I.: The injection of sulfuric acid aerosols in the stratosphere by the El Chichón volcano and its related hazards to the international air traffic, Nat. Hazards, 3, 59–67, https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00144974, 1990. a
Short summary
Using the NAME dispersion model in combination with high-resolution SO2 satellite data from TROPOMI, we investigate the dispersion of volcanic SO2 from the 2019 Raikoke eruption. NAME accurately simulates the dispersion of SO2 during the first 2–3 weeks after the eruption and illustrates the potential of using high-resolution satellite data to identify potential limitations in dispersion models, which will ultimately help to improve efforts to forecast the dispersion of volcanic clouds.
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