Articles | Volume 19, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 363–378, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-363-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 363–378, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-363-2019

Research article 11 Jan 2019

Research article | 11 Jan 2019

Climatology of Asian dust activation and transport potential based on MISR satellite observations and trajectory analysis

Yan Yu et al.

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Cited articles

Bory, A. J. M., Biscaye, P. E., and Grousset, F. E.: Two distinct seasonal Asian source regions for mineral dust deposited in Greenland (NorthGRIP), Geophys. Res. Lett., 30, 1–4, https://doi.org/10.1029/2002GL016446, 2003. 
Chen, S. Y., Huang, J., Kang, L., Wang, H., Ma, X., He, Y., Yuan, T., Yang, B., Huang, Z., and Zhang, G.: Emission, transport, and radiative effects of mineral dust from the Taklimakan and Gobi deserts: comparison of measurements and model results, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2401–2421, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2401-2017, 2017a. 
Chen, S. Y., Huang, J. P., Li, J. X., Jia, R., Jiang, N. X., Kang, L. T., Ma, X. J., and Xie, T. T.: Comparison of dust emissions, transport, and deposition between the Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Desert from 2007 to 2011, Sci. China Earth Sci., 60, 1338–1355, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11430-016-9051-0, 2017b. 
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Asian dust has been reported at remote destinations, such as North America. However, the relative contribution of the Taklamakan and Gobi deserts, the major Asian dust sources, remains unaddressed in observation. Here, satellite observations of dust plume characteristics and trajectory modeling suggest latitude-dependent influence of dust from the two deserts, with Taklamakan dust dominantly affecting areas south of 50° N and Gobi dust primarily affecting areas north of 50° N in North America.
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