Articles | Volume 17, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11991–12010, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11991-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11991–12010, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11991-2017

Research article 10 Oct 2017

Research article | 10 Oct 2017

Modeling of the chemistry in oxidation flow reactors with high initial NO

Zhe Peng and Jose L. Jimenez

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Cited articles

Aimanant, S. and Ziemann, P. J.: Chemical Mechanisms of Aging of Aerosol Formed from the Reaction of n-Pentadecane with OH Radicals in the Presence of NOx, Aerosol Sci. Tech., 47, 979–990, https://doi.org/10.1080/02786826.2013.804621, 2013.
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Ammann, M., Cox, R. A., Crowley, J. N., Jenkin, M. E., Mellouki, A., Rossi, M. J., Troe, J., Wallington, T. J., Cox, B., Atkinson, R., Baulch, D. L., and Kerr, J. A.: IUPAC Task Group on Atmospheric Chemical Kinetic Data Evaluation, available at: http://iupac.pole-ether.fr/# (last access: February 2017), 2016.
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Atkinson, R., Aschmann, S. M., and Arey, J.: Reactions of hydroxyl and nitrogen trioxide radicals with phenol, cresols, and 2-nitrophenol at 296 ± 2 K, Environ. Sci. Technol., 26, 1397–1403, https://doi.org/10.1021/es00031a018, 1992.
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Short summary
Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) have been increasingly used to study atmospheric chemistry at high NO. We show that it is very difficult to obtain high-NO chemistry (in terms of RO2 fate) in OFRs by initial NO injection. Past OFR studies with combustion sources generally had too-high precursor and NOx concentrations that caused several types of experimental artifacts. A strong dilution (× 100 or larger) may be needed for such experiments to avoid undesired chemistry.
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