Articles | Volume 20, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 4167–4191, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-4167-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 4167–4191, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-4167-2020

Research article 07 Apr 2020

Research article | 07 Apr 2020

Supercooled liquid water cloud observed, analysed, and modelled at the top of the planetary boundary layer above Dome C, Antarctica

Philippe Ricaud et al.

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Cited articles

Adhikari, L., Wang, Z., and Deng, M.: Seasonal variations of Antarctic clouds observed by CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites, J. Geophys. Res., 117, D04202, https://doi.org/10.1029/2011JD016719, 2012. 
Alfred-Wegener-Institute: Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), available at: https://bsrn.awi.de/data/data-retrieval-via-ftp/ (last access: 3 April 2020), 2008. 
Argentini, S., Viola, A., Sempreviva, A. M., and Petenko, I.: Summer boundary-layer height at the plateau site of Dome C, Antarctica, Bound.-Lay. Meteorol., 115, 409–422, 2005. 
Bromwich, D. H., Otieno, F. O., Hines, K. M., Manning, K. W., and Shilo, E.: Comprehensive evaluation of polar weather research and forecasting model performance in the Antarctic, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 118, 274–292, 2013. 
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Short summary
Thin (~ 100 m) supercooled liquid water (SLW, water staying in liquid phase below 0 °C) clouds have been detected, analysed, and modelled over the Dome C (Concordia, Antarctica) station during the austral summer 2018–2019 using observations and meteorological analyses. The SLW clouds were observed at the top of the planetary boundary layer and the SLW content was always strongly underestimated by the model indicating an incorrect simulation of the surface energy budget of the Antarctic Plateau.
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