Articles | Volume 20, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 4167–4191, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-4167-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 4167–4191, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-4167-2020

Research article 07 Apr 2020

Research article | 07 Apr 2020

Supercooled liquid water cloud observed, analysed, and modelled at the top of the planetary boundary layer above Dome C, Antarctica

Philippe Ricaud et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Philippe Ricaud on behalf of the Authors (19 Dec 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 Jan 2020) by Corinna Hoose
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (09 Feb 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Feb 2020) by Corinna Hoose
AR by Philippe Ricaud on behalf of the Authors (05 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (06 Mar 2020) by Corinna Hoose
AR by Philippe Ricaud on behalf of the Authors (06 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Thin (~ 100 m) supercooled liquid water (SLW, water staying in liquid phase below 0 °C) clouds have been detected, analysed, and modelled over the Dome C (Concordia, Antarctica) station during the austral summer 2018–2019 using observations and meteorological analyses. The SLW clouds were observed at the top of the planetary boundary layer and the SLW content was always strongly underestimated by the model indicating an incorrect simulation of the surface energy budget of the Antarctic Plateau.
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