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The requested paper has a corresponding corrigendum published. Please read the corrigendum first before downloading the article.

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Populated mountain basins, including the Salt Lake Valley (SLV) in Utah, suffer from wintertime stagnation events that trap emissions near the surface and cause fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations to reach unhealthy levels. Previously limited by a lack of nighttime measurements, this study uses 2017 UWFPS aircraft campaign data, in combination with a box model, to show that nitrogen chemistry above the surface at night is a major source of PM2.5 during a wintertime event in the SLV.
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ACP | Articles | Volume 19, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 9287–9308, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-9287-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 9287–9308, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-9287-2019

Research article 19 Jul 2019

Research article | 19 Jul 2019

On the contribution of nocturnal heterogeneous reactive nitrogen chemistry to particulate matter formation during wintertime pollution events in Northern Utah

Erin E. McDuffie et al.

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Cited articles

Anttila, T., Kiendler-Scharr, A., Tillmann, R., and Mentel, T. F.: On the reactive uptake of gaseous compounds by organic-coated aqueous aerosols: Theoretical analysis and application to the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5, J. Phys. Chem. A, 110, 10435–10443, https://doi.org/10.1021/jp062403c, 2006. 
Atkinson, R. and Arey, J.: Atmospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds, Chem. Rev., 103, 4605–4638, https://doi.org/10.1021/cr0206420, 2003. 
Baasandorj, M., Hoch, S. W., Bares, R., Lin, J. C., Brown, S. S., Millet, D. B., Martin, R., Kelly, K., Zarzana, K. J., Whiteman, C. D., Dube, W. P., Tonnesen, G., Jaramillo, I. C., and Sohl, J.: Coupling between chemical and meteorological processes under persistent cold-air pool conditions: Evolution of wintertime PM2.5 pollution events and N2O5 observations in Utah's Salt Lake Valley, Environ. Sci. Technol., 51, 5941–5950, https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b06603, 2017. 
Badger, C. L., Griffiths, P. T., George, I., Abbatt, J. P. D., and Cox, R. A.: Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosol particles containing mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulfate, J. Phys. Chem. A, 110, 6986–6994, https://doi.org/10.1021/jp0562678, 2006. 
Bahreini, R., Ervens, B., Middlebrook, A. M., Warneke, C., de Gouw, J. A., DeCarlo, P. F., Jimenez, J. L., Brock, C. A., Neuman, J. A., Ryerson, T. B., Stark, H., Atlas, E., Brioude, J., Fried, A., Holloway, J. S., Peischl, J., Richter, D., Walega, J., Weibring, P., Wollny, A. G., and Fehsenfeld, F. C.: Organic aerosol formation in urban and industrial plumes near Houston and Dallas, Texas, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 114, D00F16, https://doi.org/10.1029/2008JD011493, 2009. 
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The requested paper has a corresponding corrigendum published. Please read the corrigendum first before downloading the article.

Short summary
Populated mountain basins, including the Salt Lake Valley (SLV) in Utah, suffer from wintertime stagnation events that trap emissions near the surface and cause fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations to reach unhealthy levels. Previously limited by a lack of nighttime measurements, this study uses 2017 UWFPS aircraft campaign data, in combination with a box model, to show that nitrogen chemistry above the surface at night is a major source of PM2.5 during a wintertime event in the SLV.
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Final-revised paper
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