Articles | Volume 19, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 8101–8121, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-8101-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 8101–8121, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-8101-2019

Research article 21 Jun 2019

Research article | 21 Jun 2019

Spatial and temporal variability of snowfall over Greenland from CloudSat observations

Ralf Bennartz et al.

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Cited articles

Adhikari, A., Liu, C., and Kulie, M. S.: Global Distribution of Snow Precipitation Features and Their Properties from 3 Years of GPM Observations, J. Climate, 31, 3731–3754, https://doi.org/10.1175/jcli-d-17-0012.1, 2018. 
Behrangi, A., Christensen, M., Richardson, M., Lebsock, M., Stephens, G., Huffman, G. J., Bolvin, D., Adler, R. F., Gardner, A., Lambrigtsen, B., and Fetzer, E.: Status of high-latitude precipitation estimates from observations and reanalyses, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 121, 4468–4486, https://doi.org/10.1002/2015jd024546, 2016. 
Berdahl, M., Rennermalm, A., Hammann, A., Mioduszweski, J., Hameed, S., Tedesco, M., Stroeve, J., Mote, T., Koyama, T., and McConnell, J. R.: Southeast Greenland Winter Precipitation Strongly Linked to the Icelandic Low Position, J. Climate, 31, 4483–4500, https://doi.org/10.1175/jcli-d-17-0622.1, 2018. 
Box, J. and Steffen, K.: Greenland Climate Network (GC-NET) Data Reference, available at: http://cires1.colorado.edu/steffen/gcnet/Gc-net_documentation_Nov_10_2000.pdf (last access: 9 June 2019), 2000. 
Castellani, B. B., Shupe, M. D., Hudak, D. R., and Sheppard, B. E.: The annual cycle of snowfall at Summit, Greenland, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 120, 6654–6668, https://doi.org/10.1002/2015jd023072, 2015. 
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Short summary
The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is rapidly melting. Snowfall is the only source of ice mass over the GrIS. We use satellite observations to assess how much snow on average falls over the GrIS and what the annual cycle and spatial distribution of snowfall is. We find the annual mean snowfall over the GrIS inferred from CloudSat to be 34 ± 7.5 cm yr−1 liquid equivalent.
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