Articles | Volume 18, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 17745–17768, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-17745-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 17745–17768, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-17745-2018

Research article 14 Dec 2018

Research article | 14 Dec 2018

Radiative effect and climate impacts of brown carbon with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5)

Hunter Brown et al.

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In climate models, organic carbon (OC) in wildfire smoke has been treated as an atmospheric cooling component by reflecting sunlight back to space. This study incorporates the observationally identified absorbing brown carbon component of OC into the Community Earth System Model, improving the agreement between the model and observations and effectively increasing absorption of solar radiation. This change contributes to altered atmospheric dynamics and changes in cloud cover in the model.
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