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Volume 16, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 12411–12424, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-12411-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 12411–12424, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-12411-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 04 Oct 2016

Research article | 04 Oct 2016

What controls the low ice number concentration in the upper troposphere?

Cheng Zhou1, Joyce E. Penner1, Guangxing Lin1,a, Xiaohong Liu2, and Minghuai Wang3,4 Cheng Zhou et al.
  • 1Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
  • 2Department of Atmospheric Science, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA
  • 3Institute for Climate and Global Change Research & School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, 210023 Nanjing, China
  • 4Collaborative Innovation Center of Climate Change, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China
  • anow at: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA

Abstract. Cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause play a key role in regulating the moisture entering the stratosphere through their dehydrating effect. Low ice number concentrations ( <  200 L−1) and high supersaturations (150–160 %) have been observed in these clouds. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain these low ice number concentrations, including the inhibition of homogeneous freezing by the deposition of water vapour onto pre-existing ice crystals, heterogeneous ice formation on glassy organic aerosol ice nuclei (IN), and limiting the formation of ice number from high-frequency gravity waves. In this study, we examined the effect from three different representations of updraft velocities, the effect from pre-existing ice crystals, the effect from different water vapour deposition coefficients (α  =  0.1 or 1), and the effect of 0.1 % of the total secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles acting as IN. Model-simulated ice crystal numbers are compared against an aircraft observational dataset.

Including the effect from water vapour deposition on pre-existing ice particles can effectively reduce simulated in-cloud ice number concentrations for all model setups. A larger water vapour deposition coefficient (α  =  1) can also efficiently reduce ice number concentrations at temperatures below 205 K, but less so at higher temperatures. SOA acting as IN is most effective at reducing ice number concentrations when the effective updraft velocities are moderate ( ∼  0.05–0.2 m s−1). However, the effects of including SOA as IN and using (α  =  1) are diminished when the effect from pre-existing ice is included.

When a grid-resolved large-scale updraft velocity ( <  0.1 m s−1) is used, the ice nucleation parameterization with homogeneous freezing only or with both homogeneous freezing and heterogeneous nucleation is able to generate low ice number concentrations in good agreement with observations for temperatures below 205 K as long as the pre-existing ice effect is included. For the moderate updraft velocity ( ∼  0.05–0.2 m s−1), simulated ice number concentrations in good agreement with observations at temperatures below 205 K can be achieved if effects from pre-existing ice, a larger water vapour deposition coefficient (α  =  1), and SOA IN are all included. Using the sub-grid-scale turbulent kinetic energy (TKE)-based updraft velocity ( ∼  0–2 m s−1) always overestimates the ice number concentrations at temperatures below 205 K but compares well with observations at temperatures above 205 K when the pre-existing ice effect is included.

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We examined the different ice nucleation parameterization factors that affect the simulated ice number concentrations in cirrus clouds in the upper troposphere using the CAM5 model. We examined the effect from three different updraft velocities (from low to high), two different water vapour accommodation coefficients (α = 0.1 or 1), the effect of including vapour deposition onto pre-existing ice particles during ice nucleation, and the effect of including SOA as heterogeneous ice nuclei.
We examined the different ice nucleation parameterization factors that affect the simulated ice...
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