Articles | Volume 20, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 323–331, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-323-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 323–331, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-323-2020
Research article
08 Jan 2020
Research article | 08 Jan 2020

The impact of improved satellite retrievals on estimates of biospheric carbon balance

Scot M. Miller and Anna M. Michalak

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Cited articles

Baker, D.: OCO-2 v9 ocean glint bias correction, in: Fall Science Team Meeting, NASA OCO-2 Science Team, Boulder CO, 2018. a
Baker, D. F., Bösch, H., Doney, S. C., O'Brien, D., and Schimel, D. S.: Carbon source/sink information provided by column CO2 measurements from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 4145–4165, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-10-4145-2010, 2010. a
Chatterjee, A., Gierach, M. M., Sutton, A. J., Feely, R. A., Crisp, D., Eldering, A., Gunson, M. R., O'Dell, C. W., Stephens, B. B., and Schimel, D. S.: Influence of El Niño on atmospheric CO2 over the tropical Pacific Ocean: Findings from NASA's OCO-2 mission, Science, 358, eaam5776, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aam5776, 2017. a
Chevallier, F., Bron, F.-M., and Rayner, P. J.: Contribution of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory to the estimation of CO2 sources and sinks: Theoretical study in a variational data assimilation framework, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 112, d09307, https://doi.org/10.1029/2006JD007375, 2007. a
Crowell, S., Baker, D., Schuh, A., Basu, S., Jacobson, A. R., Chevallier, F., Liu, J., Deng, F., Feng, L., McKain, K., Chatterjee, A., Miller, J. B., Stephens, B. B., Eldering, A., Crisp, D., Schimel, D., Nassar, R., O'Dell, C. W., Oda, T., Sweeney, C., Palmer, P. I., and Jones, D. B. A.: The 2015–2016 carbon cycle as seen from OCO-2 and the global in situ network, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 9797–9831, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-9797-2019, 2019. a, b, c, d
Short summary
NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) satellite observes CO2 in the atmosphere. The satellite measures radiation, and these measurements are then converted to an estimate of atmospheric CO2. This conversion or retrieval algorithm has improved markedly since the satellite launch. We find that these improvements in the CO2 retrieval are having a potentially transformative effect on satellite-based estimates of the global biospheric carbon balance.
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