Articles | Volume 19, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 2385–2403, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-2385-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 2385–2403, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-2385-2019

Research article 22 Feb 2019

Research article | 22 Feb 2019

Local and remote temperature response of regional SO2 emissions

Anna Lewinschal et al.

Related authors

Reduced effective radiative forcing from cloud-aerosol interactions (ERFaci) with improved treatment of early aerosol growth in an Earth System Model
Sara Marie Blichner, Moa Kristina Sporre, and Terje Koren Berntsen
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-151,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-151, 2021
Preprint under review for ACP
Short summary
The importance of Aitken mode aerosol particles for cloud sustenance in the summertime high Arctic – a simulation study supported by observational data
Ines Bulatovic, Adele L. Igel, Caroline Leck, Jost Heintzenberg, Ilona Riipinen, and Annica M. L. Ekman
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 3871–3897, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-3871-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-3871-2021, 2021
Short summary
Aerosol absorption in global models from AeroCom Phase III
Maria Sand, Bjørn H. Samset, Gunnar Myhre, Jonas Gliß, Susanne E. Bauer, Huisheng Bian, Mian Chin, Ramiro Checa-Garcia, Paul Ginoux, Zak Kipling, Alf Kirkevåg, Harri Kokkola, Philippe Le Sager, Marianne T. Lund, Hitoshi Matsui, Twan van Noije, Samuel Remy, Michael Schulz, Philip Stier, Camilla W. Stjern, Toshihiko Takemura, Kostas Tsigaridis, Svetlana G. Tsyro, and Duncan Watson-Parris
Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-51,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-51, 2021
Preprint under review for ACP
Short summary
Improving the representation of high-latitude vegetation distribution in dynamic global vegetation models
Peter Horvath, Hui Tang, Rune Halvorsen, Frode Stordal, Lena Merete Tallaksen, Terje Koren Berntsen, and Anders Bryn
Biogeosciences, 18, 95–112, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-95-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-95-2021, 2021
Short summary
Constraining the Twomey effect from satellite observations: issues and perspectives
Johannes Quaas, Antti Arola, Brian Cairns, Matthew Christensen, Hartwig Deneke, Annica M. L. Ekman, Graham Feingold, Ann Fridlind, Edward Gryspeerdt, Otto Hasekamp, Zhanqing Li, Antti Lipponen, Po-Lun Ma, Johannes Mülmenstädt, Athanasios Nenes, Joyce E. Penner, Daniel Rosenfeld, Roland Schrödner, Kenneth Sinclair, Odran Sourdeval, Philip Stier, Matthias Tesche, Bastiaan van Diedenhoven, and Manfred Wendisch
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 15079–15099, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15079-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15079-2020, 2020
Short summary

Related subject area

Subject: Aerosols | Research Activity: Atmospheric Modelling | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
Aerosol dynamics and dispersion of radioactive particles
Pontus von Schoenberg, Peter Tunved, Håkan Grahn, Alfred Wiedensohler, Radovan Krejci, and Niklas Brännström
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5173–5193, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5173-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5173-2021, 2021
Short summary
Development and intercity transferability of land-use regression models for predicting ambient PM10, PM2.5, NO2 and O3 concentrations in northern Taiwan
Zhiyuan Li, Kin-Fai Ho, Hsiao-Chi Chuang, and Steve Hung Lam Yim
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5063–5078, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5063-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5063-2021, 2021
Short summary
Constraints on global aerosol number concentration, SO2 and condensation sink in UKESM1 using ATom measurements
Ananth Ranjithkumar, Hamish Gordon, Christina Williamson, Andrew Rollins, Kirsty Pringle, Agnieszka Kupc, Nathan Luke Abraham, Charles Brock, and Ken Carslaw
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4979–5014, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4979-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4979-2021, 2021
Short summary
Turbulence-permitting air pollution simulation for the Stuttgart metropolitan area
Thomas Schwitalla, Hans-Stefan Bauer, Kirsten Warrach-Sagi, Thomas Bönisch, and Volker Wulfmeyer
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4575–4597, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4575-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4575-2021, 2021
Short summary
Temporally resolved sectoral and regional contributions to air pollution in Beijing: informing short-term emission controls
Tabish Umar Ansari, Oliver Wild, Edmund Ryan, Ying Chen, Jie Li, and Zifa Wang
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4471–4485, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4471-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4471-2021, 2021
Short summary

Cited articles

Aamaas, B., Peters, G. P., and Fuglestvedt, J. S.: Simple emission metrics for climate impacts, Earth Syst. Dynam., 4, 145–170, https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-4-145-2013, 2013. a
Acosta Navarro, J. C., Varma, V., Riipinen, I., Seland, O., Kirkevag, A., Struthers, H., Iversen, T., Hansson, H. C., and Ekman, A. M. L.: Amplification of Arctic warming by past air pollution reductions in Europe, Nat. Geosci., 9, 277–281, https://doi.org/10.1038/NGEO2673, 2016. a
Albrecht, B.: Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and fractional cloudiness, Science, 245, 1227–1230, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.245.4923.1227, 1989. a
Amann, M., Bertok, I., Borken-Kleefeld, J., Cofala, J., Heyes, C., Hoeglund-Isaksson, L., Klimont, Z., Nguyen, B., Posch, M., Rafaj, P., Sandler, R., Schoepp, W., Wagner, F., and Winiwarter, W.: Cost-effective control of air quality and greenhouse gases in Europe: Modeling and policy applications, Environ. Modell. Softw., 26, 1489–1501, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2011.07.012, 2011. a
Bellouin, N., Baker, L., Hodnebrog, Ø., Olivié, D., Cherian, R., Macintosh, C., Samset, B., Esteve, A., Aamaas, B., Quaas, J., and Myhre, G.: Regional and seasonal radiative forcing by perturbations to aerosol and ozone precursor emissions, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 13885–13910, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-13885-2016, 2016. a
Download
Short summary
We use a global climate model to study how anthropogenic emissions of short-lived atmospheric particles in different parts of the world influence the global temperature distribution. We find that the global mean temperature change per unit emission is similar for all emission regions, and the largest temperature response is found in the Arctic no matter where the emissions occur. However, for European emissions, the temperature change per unit emission is found to depend on emission strength.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint