Articles | Volume 19, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 12857–12874, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12857-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 12857–12874, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12857-2019

Research article 16 Oct 2019

Research article | 16 Oct 2019

Aerosol vertical mass flux measurements during heavy aerosol pollution episodes at a rural site and an urban site in the Beijing area of the North China Plain

Renmin Yuan et al.

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Short summary
To understand the contribution of ground emission during heavy pollution in Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei, aerosol fluxes were estimated in Beijing and Gucheng areas. The results show that in the three stages of a heavy pollution process (transport, accumulative and removal stages: TS, AS and RS), the ground emissions in the TS and RS stages are stronger, while the ground discharge in the AS stage is weak. The weakened mass flux indicates that the already weak turbulence would be further weakened.
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