Articles | Volume 17, issue 15
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9697-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9697-2017
Research article
 | 
15 Aug 2017
Research article |  | 15 Aug 2017

Sources of springtime surface black carbon in the Arctic: an adjoint analysis for April 2008

Ling Qi, Qinbin Li, Daven K. Henze, Hsien-Liang Tseng, and Cenlin He

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Cited articles

AMAP: Snow, Water, Ice and Permafrost in the Arctic (SWIPA), Climate Change and the Cryosphere, Arctic Monitoring and As- sessment Programme (AMAP), Oslo, Narayana Press, Gylling, Denmark, ISBN-13: 978-82-7971-073-8, 538 pp., 2011.
Bond, T. C., Bhardwaj, E., Dong, R., Jogani, R., Jung, S. K., Roden, C., Streets, D. G., and Trautmann, N. M.: Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850–2000, Global Biogeochem. Cy., 21, GB2018, https://doi.org/10.1029/2006gb002840, 2007.
Bourgeois, Q. and Bey, I.: Pollution transport efficiency toward the Arctic: Sensitivity to aerosol scavenging and source regions, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 116, 5380–5552, https://doi.org/10.1029/2010jd015096, 2011.
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We find that Asian anthropogenic sources are the largest contributors (~ 40 %) to surface BC in spring in the Arctic, inconsistent with previous studies which repeatedly identified sources of surface BC as anthropogenic emissions from Europe and Russia. It takes 12–17 days for Asian anthropogenic emissions to be transported to the Arctic surface. Additionally, a large fraction (40–65 %) of Asian contribution is in the form of chronic pollution on 1- to 2-month timescales.
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