Articles | Volume 17, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6565–6581, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6565-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6565–6581, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6565-2017
Research article
02 Jun 2017
Research article | 02 Jun 2017

Regional background O3 and NOx in the Houston–Galveston–Brazoria (TX) region: a decadal-scale perspective

Loredana G. Suciu et al.

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Cited articles

Banta, R. M., Senff, C. J., Nielsen-Gammon, J., Darby, L. S., Ryerson, T. B., Alvarez, R. J., Sandberg, S. P., Williams, E. J., and Trainer, M.: A Bad Air Day in Houston, B. Am. Meteorol. Soc., 86, 657–669, https://doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-86-5-657, 2005.
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Berlin, S. R., Langford, A. O., Estes, M., Dong, M., and Parrish, D. D.: Magnitude, Decadal Changes, and Impact of Regional Background Ozone Transported into the Greater Houston, Texas, Area, Environ. Sci. Technol., 47, 13985–13992, https://doi.org/10.1021/es4037644, 2013.
Camalier, L., Cox, W., and Dolwick, P.: The effects of meteorology on ozone in urban areas and their use in assessing ozone trends, Atmos. Environ., 41, 7127–7137, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.04.061, 2007.
Choi, Y.: The impact of satellite-adjusted NOx emissions on simulated NOx and O3 discrepancies in the urban and outflow areas of the Pacific and Lower Middle US, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 675–690, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-675-2014, 2014.
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Short summary
Understanding of the variability of ozone (O3) in space and time is essential to the design of efficient air quality controls. We used statistical analysis of O3, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and weather measurements to estimate the large-scale contributions of O3 and NOx in southeastern Texas. We found that these “external” contributions have declined over time, likely due to a combination of controls on O3 precursors and increases in the frequency of prevailing southerly flow from the Gulf of Mexico.
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