Articles | Volume 17, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7541–7554, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7541-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7541–7554, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7541-2017

Research article 22 Jun 2017

Research article | 22 Jun 2017

Status update: is smoke on your mind? Using social media to assess smoke exposure

Bonne Ford et al.

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Cited articles

Abel, F., Hauff, C., Houben, G.-J., Stronkman, R., and Tao, K.: Twitcident: Fighting Fire with Information from Social Web Streams, in Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on World Wide Web, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 305–308, 2012.
Alman, B., Pfister, G., Hao, H., Stowell, J., Hu, X., Liu, Y., and Strickland, M. J.: The association of wildfire smoke with respiratory and cardiovascular emergency department visits in Colorado in 2012: a case crossover study, Environ. Health, 15, 1–9, https://doi.org/10.1186/s12940-016-0146-8, 2016.
Bedo, M., Blanco, G., Oliveira, W., Cazzolato, M., Costa, A., Rodrigues, J., Traina, A., and Traina Jr., C.: Techniques for effective and efficient fire detection from social media images, ArXiv150603844 Cs, available at: http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.03844 (last Aaccess: 29 November 2016), 2015.
Broniatowski, D. A., Paul, M. J., and Dredze, M.: National and Local Influenza Surveillance through Twitter: An Analysis of the 2012-2013 Influenza Epidemic, PLOS ONE, 8, e83672, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0083672, 2013.
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Short summary
We explore using the percent of Facebook posters mentioning smoke or air quality to assess exposure to wildfire smoke in the western US during summer 2015. We compare this de-identified, aggregated Facebook dataset to satellite observations, surface measurements, and model-simulated concentrations, and we find good agreement in smoke-impacted regions. Our results suggest that aggregate social media data can be used to supplement traditional datasets to estimate smoke exposure.
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