Articles | Volume 17, issue 12
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7541-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7541-2017
Research article
 | 
22 Jun 2017
Research article |  | 22 Jun 2017

Status update: is smoke on your mind? Using social media to assess smoke exposure

Bonne Ford, Moira Burke, William Lassman, Gabriele Pfister, and Jeffrey R. Pierce

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Latest update: 27 May 2023
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Short summary
We explore using the percent of Facebook posters mentioning smoke or air quality to assess exposure to wildfire smoke in the western US during summer 2015. We compare this de-identified, aggregated Facebook dataset to satellite observations, surface measurements, and model-simulated concentrations, and we find good agreement in smoke-impacted regions. Our results suggest that aggregate social media data can be used to supplement traditional datasets to estimate smoke exposure.
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