Articles | Volume 17, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6693–6704, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6693-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6693–6704, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6693-2017

Research article 08 Jun 2017

Research article | 08 Jun 2017

Modelling micro- and macrophysical contributors to the dissipation of an Arctic mixed-phase cloud during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS)

Katharina Loewe et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Processes that affect Arctic mixed-phase cloud life cycle are extremely important for the surface energy budget. Three different sensitivity experiments mimic changes in the advection of air masses with different thermodynamic profiles and aerosol properties to find the potential mechanisms leading to the dissipation of the cloud. We found that the reduction of the cloud droplet number concentration was likely the primary contributor to the dissipation of the observed Arctic mixed-phase cloud.
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